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U.S. Department of Education

Staff Report
to the
Senior Department Official
on
Recognition Compliance Issues

RECOMMENDATION PAGE

1.
Agency:   Teacher Education Accreditation Council (2003/2005)
                  (The dates provided are the date of initial listing as a recognized agency and the date of the agency’s last grant of recognition.)
 
2.
Action Item:   Other Report
 
3.
Current Scope of Recognition:   The accreditation and pre-accreditation throughout the United States of professional teacher education programs in institutions offering baccalaureate and graduate degrees for the preparation of K-12 teachers.

4.
Date of Advisory Committee Meeting:   June, 2016
 
5.
Staff Recommendation:   Withdraw recognition from TEAC, and remove TEAC from the published list of nationally recognized accrediting bodies, effective on the date of the official notification letter from the Senior Department Official.
 
6.
Issues or Problems:   The agency does not meet the following section of the Secretary’s Criteria for Recognition. This issue is summarized below and discussed in detail under the Summary of Findings section.

-- TEAC has ceased to exist as an independent accrediting agency, which de facto severed any previous Federal link, and rendered moot any question of continuing program eligibility based on TEAC accreditation. [§602.10]



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 
 

PART I: GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE AGENCY

 
The Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) was a programmatic accreditor. Its scope of recognition was for the accreditation and pre-accreditation throughout the United States of professional teacher education programs in institutions offering baccalaureate and graduate degrees for the preparation of K-12 teachers. During its last review for recognition, TEAC had accredited or preaccredited approximately 95 institutional members in 32 states and the District of Columbia, and had 18 professional associations as members of the agency.

Accreditation by TEAC was a required element in enabling its programs to establish eligibility to participate in a non-HEA Federal program. The non-HEA program provided grants for training teachers in special education under the Department of Education's Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Reductions in available IDEA grants resulted in vastly diminished participation by TEAC programs.

The fact that TEAC has ceased to exist as an independent accrediting agency de facto severed any previous Federal link, and rendered moot any question of continuing program eligibility based on TEAC accreditation.

In conjunction with the current request for withdrawal of recognition, Department staff provided four pertinent documents under 602.10 (Link to Federal programs). The first document dated November 13, 2014 was to the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), which is the organization that absorbed both TEAC and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). That document noted that the renewal of recognition for both NCATE and TEAC was overdue, and that a formal notice to submit those petitions in June 2015 would be forthcoming.

The next document, dated December 15, 2014 was sent to both NCATE and TEAC and formally informed them that their petitions for renewed recognition were to be submitted to the Department by June 4, 2015.

The third document, dated November 10, 2015, was addressed to CAEP and informed the agency that since the renewal petitions had not been submitted, a formal action to remove NCATE and TEAC from the list of nationally recognized accrediting agencies would be placed on the spring meeting agenda of the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI).

The final document from March 28, 2016 is a copy of the notice that CAEP provided to its NCATE and TEAC constituents notifying them of the impending withdrawal of recognition to be considered at the June 2016 meeting of NACIQI. (CAEP provided that document to the Department in an email dated March 30, 2016.)
 
 
Recognition History
 
The agency was established in 1997 to recognize and promote high-quality teacher education programs in colleges and universities. Several higher educational organizations supported TEAC’s initial recognition by the Department, including the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC); the American Association of Universities (AAU); the American Council on Education (ACE); the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU); and the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC).

The Department granted the agency initial recognition after the June 2003 meeting of the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI). Several educational entities, including the International Reading Association, the National Council of Teachers of English and the American Federation of Teachers became affiliate members of TEAC after the agency was granted recognition by the Department. The agency was considered for renewed recognition at the June 2005 NACIQI meeting, and as a result, the Secretary renewed TEAC’s recognition.



PART II: SUMMARY OF FINDINGS

 
§602.10 Link to Federal programs


The agency must demonstrate that--



(a) If the agency accredits institutions of higher education, its accreditation is a required element in enabling at least one of those institutions to establish eligibility to participate in HEA programs; or


(b) If the agency accredits institutions of higher education or higher education programs, or both, its accreditation is a required element in enabling at least one of those entities to establish eligibility to participate in non-HEA Federal programs.

 
Accreditation by TEAC was a required element in enabling its programs to establish eligibility to participate in a non-HEA Federal program. The non-HEA program provided grants for training teachers in special education under the Department of Education's Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Reductions in available IDEA grants resulted in vastly diminished participation by TEAC programs.

TEAC phased out its independent accrediting activities when it was totally absorbed into another accrediting body that is not recognized. In addition, TEAC failed to respond to two written requests regarding the need to submit a petition for continued recognition if it wished to remain on the list of recognized agencies. In accordance with 602.31(a) an accrediting agency seeking initial or continued recognition must submit a written application at least once every five years. This agency has not done so.

Currently, the fact that TEAC has ceased to exist as an independent accrediting agency de facto severed any previous Federal link, and rendered moot any question of continuing program eligibility based on TEAC accreditation.
 
 

PART III: THIRD PARTY COMMENTS

 
The Department did not receive any written third-party comments regarding this agency.